Composters

Composters

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Today, composting is becoming more and more popular. In fact, municipalities are encouraging and even requiring citizens to begin composting as much of their garbage as possible.

Did you know that over 2/3 of your garbage is compostable? If you were to start composting at home, you would greatly reduce the amount of garbage to be picked up and carried to landfills.

Composting at home can be accomplished more easily through the use of a composter. Now what is a composter? A composter is a bin or container in which you place organic waste materials to be composted. Composting, by the way, is the biological process through which organic wastes are reduced to humus, which is dark, earth like organic matter.

What kinds of composter are available?

Basically, there are three different styles of composters: compost bins, compost tumblers and worm composting bins. Each composter has its advantages and disadvantages.

Compost Bins

The most basic of composters is the compost bin. The typical compost bin is constructed out of heavy-duty plastic and is usually black or dark-green, which is good for retaining heat and keeping internal composting temperatures high; thereby accelerating the composting process.

Compost bins are simple and easy to assemble and they are usually the least expensive family of composters. Most compost bins have an average height of around 3-4 feet and a capacity of around 80-160 gallons. Compost bins can be discreetly placed anywhere in one’s backyard. Also, most manufacturered compost bins have a lid to keep out unwanted “critters.”

Compost Tumblers

The next type of composter is a compost tumbler. A compost tumbler is usually a little more costly than a compost bin, but it has its definite advantages. A compost tumbler, as its name implies, allows the composting chamber to be turned on its axis. The benefit of turning is that the organic materials are constantly mixed, and this mixing helps accelerate the composting process. Compost tumblers, therefore, are able to produce finished compost more quickly than compost bins.

The homeowner need only spin the compost tumbler several times a week to keep things going along. Most compost tumblers have capacities similar to typical compost bins.

Worm Composting Bins

The last type of composter is a worm composting bin. As you might suspect, worms are the “composting engine” that powers a worm compost bin. The nice thing about worm bins is that they can be used indoors, which make them an excellent choice for apartment dwellers.

The typical worms used in worm bins is the red brandling worm. The bottom tray is filled with moist bedding materials. Worms are then added. Another tray is added above where waste food is placed. The worms migrate upward and begin feasting on the food.

The worms leave behind castings or “poo,” which is the richest compost available. Also, most worm bins collect compost tea. Compost tea is a wonderfully rich liquid fertilizer that can be used in your garden or on your flowers.

The only concern with a worm composter is the need to avoid temperature extremes. Your worm composter should not be located in direct sunlight or left outside when evening temperatures begin approaching 40 degrees. It is at this point that the worm composter can be brought in and kept in a basement or garage.

How much do I need to spend on a composter?

The typical price range for a composter ranges from under $100.00 to around $400.00 depending on which model you choose. Most compost bins fall in the $100-$150 price range, while most compost tumblers fall in the $200-$400 price range.

What is the best composter for me?

To answer this question, you need to first decide which composting method you may prefer. The are two basic methods of composting–we call them the “patient composting method” and the “results-oriented composting method.”

If you are the type of person who is in no great hurry to have finished compost, and you composting out of a desire to help the environment, a compost bin will probably suit your needs quite well. Compost bins fall under the “patient composting method” category because it usually takes several months before you have finished compost.

However, if you are someone who wants to make things happen, you may want to consider a compost tumbler. Compost tumblers fall under the “results-oriented composting method” category because you will typically have finished compost in several weeks. A compost tumbler would be good for someone who desires a continuous suppy of compost for a garden.

Start composting!

Composters come in many shapes and sizes. Rest assured there is a composter out there for everyoe. Go find your todayl! Be sure to check our our Composter Store. All orders ship Free. Go luck and happy composting. Remember, “Don’t throw it away, compost it!” TM

Composter Reviews

If you would like to learn more about some of the composters that we carry, simply click on any of the pictures below to read a review of that particular composter.

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Tumbleweed Compost Tumbler
Tumbleweed
The Worm Factory® 360
The Worm Factory® 360
Jora Composter JK270
Jora Composter JK270


Soil Saver Compost Bin
Soil Saver Compost Bin

 

ECO Compost Bin
ECO Compost Bin


Envirocycle Compost Tumbler
Envirocycle Tumbler


Earthmaker Composter
Earthmaker Composter


Wishing Well Compost Bin
Wishing Well Compost Bin


Pet Poo Composter
Pet Poo Composter

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